The Anxiety Show

By: Taylor

Anxiety is something that’s a part of everyone’s lives. It’s a makeup of the human condition; a part of the gig no one necessarily wants; yet it exists regardless. It can be predominantly present or hiding under the bed, but that in no way means it’s non-existent in your life. Just because you don’t feel it now doesn’t mean you never have or never will. The thing about anxiety is that people (very much so) experience it differently. The kid on the bus silently reading a book could be stressing hard over x, y, and z; you’d never know he’s on the verge. Or there are people like myself, Taylor, who have let anxiety take over some pretty awesome moments due to what can only be described as a crippling sensation of a bomb aftermath.

 

And . . . fun times were had by all . . . No, not really, but this anxiety that we all experience, it’s seldom spoken about; seldom understood in a comprehensive way. If we asked, “What is anxiety?”—Would your answer start with, “The feeling when…”? Look, we aren’t claiming to be the anxiety experts over here, either. We just have taken the education and thought on anxiety to a different level for you; for any and everyone.

 

There’s already so much misconception around what anxiety is, and we’d like to clear that up and shake that down a bit. Here, we’ve defined anxiety in our own words, and that goes as follows:

 

“To be fearful of the future and lacking a sense of security about an uncertain situation that is under consideration.”

 

that may be a lot to process, but bare with us, here. When you feel anxious, it’s generally about an unknown; work, relationships, or health—you name it. Why are you fearful about it? Because you don’t have a solid, clear end result in mind, and that’s a scary thing. Why’s it under consideration? You obviously want it, but there’s a clear layer of fear surrounding it because you want it. But with that want, there’s the whole “unknown” thing. That’s the part that shakes you to your core. It’s the risk of a, b, c, or d that comes with any road you may or may not take. The thing is . . .you can’t sit in an indecisive zone for very long without repercussions. You have to make decisions; that’s another part of the human condition. Whether you’re feeling ready or not is beside the point because truly—you’ll never “feel” 100% ready, ever, about anything. New parents don’t have a guide telling them how to be a parent, they just do. So maybe, just maybe, it’s about saying screw it and diving in, wherever you are.

 

If there’s any constant in life, it’s the existence of uncertainty in your everyday. There will always be things you don’t have answers to, situations you can’t possibly plan for, and events you simply don’t have control over. The key to life isn’t having the answers; it’s knowing that it’s OK to not have the answers. Say you have a big presentation coming up at work in front of a group of peers that you seldom work with. You’re going to be nervous, and you’re going to have anxiety. That’s natural. That’s normal. That’s expected. Why wouldn’t you be nervous about it? It means something to you, and no one wants to enter a room only to leave it feeling like a complete moron.

 

That’s the anxiety talking, though. Chances are you’re not a moron, and you’re just being outrageously hard on yourself. For whatever reason, we’re all usually much harder on ourselves than we would be to literally any other human being. So what would happen if we were to start speaking to ourselves the way we’d talk to a dear friend? Would that anxiety begin to melt away? The answer is yes and no. Obviously one small shift isn’t going to instantaneously move mountains, but it’s crucial to identify that it will, in fact, make a change. Even if it’s a small one, change is still change, and when it comes to anxiety, even the smallest steps should be look at through the most victorious eyes. As we’ve discussed before, this is part of a shift in perspective, which is no easy task. If you’re the person who doesn’t believe a shift in perspective could genuinely, meaningfully and positively impact your life, yet you suffer from anxiety, well . . . you’re walking a thin line between reality and delusion; between accuracy and avoidance, and it might be time to take the blinders off.

 

This isn’t saying we minimize whatever it may be that you’re going through. We know anxiety is real, and we are right there with everyone who experiences these feelings every day. We also know how beneficial a shift in ones perspective can be, and we want to guide others to the same realizations. Generalized anxiety can be crippling—take it from those who are first-hand battlers of said anxiety. But here’s the thing . . .you can’t sit around your whole life being the victim of your circumstances. We’ve all been down; we’ve all fallen victim to this way of life; to the poor-me mindset. Some of us (or one of us…OK it’s me) felt that way merely 5 minutes ago. But guess what? To get off the floor, you can’t just sit there, twiddling your thumbs. You have to actively try to get the hell up.

 

Sure, it’s easier to cry in the midst of your anxiety overload and let it run you, but where’s that going to get you? We’ll tell you—nowhere. It gets you stuck in the mouse wheel of life, going nowhere fast (and in an anxious way, at that). If this isn’t what you saw for your life, then change it. Decide that now, and 5 minutes from now, and 3 hours from now, and tomorrow, and next month . . . that you won’t let this bullshit run your life. That you won’t let it run you. Your mind is powerful, and when you use it for the better as opposed to it using you . . . beautiful things will unfold. You’ve got to hold onto the strength you’ve been given and use It for good, for the bettering of yourself; not for the crippling of your mind.

 

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